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Brother of Columbine victim brings message of healing to students after Oxford High School shooting

Craig Scott lost his sister in the 1999 Columbine High School shooting.

Rachel Scott was the first of 13 people killed when two students went on a rampage at a Colorado school.

Now, he’s traveling the country as part of the Rachel Challenge, visiting schools and talking to students. He visited Michigan on Monday with a message of recovery after the Oxford High School shooting.

Scott said he wanted to be a “beacon of joy” for affected students.

Scott said, “I had two friends who were killed next to me in a room where 10 students were killed, more than 20 were injured, and then I lost my sister. What am I going to tell myself.” “And that’s what I went for there.”

Scott shared with the students what he would tell his 16-year-old self: “Be aware of how you feel and talk about it.”

Related: Over 80 school bands, orchestras and choirs honor Oxford victims by playing a combat song

“I’ve also talked to parents about not putting pressure on kids to participate,” Scott said. Talk to the children about this event.

He said the same advice applies to teachers and administrators when students return to school.

“Academics put knowledge and academic achievement aside a bit – it’s time to connect with their hearts,” he said. Open up. Be honest with them about how it affects you and say, ‘I’m here if anyone wants to talk to me,’ Scott said.

He also asked the community to support those affected by the shooting in the coming months.

“If you know the family of a victim or someone who was shot or have a friend who goes there and is having a hard time, now is the time to prepare a meal for them and bring it with them,” he said. “Or invite them to something special, do something nice, or write them a letter of encouragement.”

more: How to help survivors and families of Oxford High School victims

Scott encouraged the students not to live in fear, even as threats to the school surfaced in the aftermath of the shooting.

“I understand that we have to take threats seriously but at the same time I am really trying to tell parents, teachers and students not to be afraid,” he said. “When you focus on kindness and compassion, it automatically gets rid of an air of separation, isolation, and bullying — all these kinds of negative things. So, focus on the right things — you’ll automatically negate the wrong things.”

He also challenged people’s silence to be kind.

“My sister, a month before the Columbine shooting happened, challenged the younger generation to show empathy and initiate a kind chain reaction,” he said. “When you focus on kindness and compassion, it automatically gets rid of an air of separation, isolation, and bullying — all these kinds of negative things — so focus on the right things — it will automatically banish the wrong things.”

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