Ds Scholarship

Westfall Scholars honored at biannual event

The Westfall Scholars Luncheon is a bi-annual award ceremony that honors fall and spring graduating students from each academic department with the highest GPAs. David Westphal is the founding dean of the College of Science. During his tenure as Dean, he established this award (formerly the Dean’s Senior Scholar) to honor the best graduating students in the College of Science and their selected faculty mentor. The award was later named in his honor upon his retirement in 2007. Westfall teaches at the university, was the college’s founding dean and continues to encourage its students through this event that honors fall and spring alumni.

Both scholars spoke in front of family and friends and their mentor in the faculty. Also in attendance were the Deans of the College of Science, Acting Dean McCall, David and Shirley Westfall. Westfall scholars share their future plans, tips, and goals below.

Henry Tang, Department of Biology

What are your plans after graduation?

The UN agency has truly accelerated my passion for medicine not only through the service and leadership experience I have gained but more importantly, the friendships and mentors I have developed a strong relationship with throughout my journey. I hope to get into medical school to become a doctor who serves my community, to help alleviate any suffering anyone might be experiencing.

What is the most important piece of advice you would give a new college student?

Develop new contacts. Develop new relationships. Continue to develop existing relationships and connections. I couldn’t do it without the support of the people around me. College is not like high school. The level of education and the amount of new people you will meet goes up exponentially. Having the support of friends and mentors, new and old, helped me succeed in college. Their support really motivated and motivated me.

Where do you see yourself after 15 years?

I hope to see myself having spent 4 years in medical school and years of residency to become a physician and specialize in a field I am happy to be in. I hope to work alongside other doctors to help those in my community.

Julia Davidson, Department of Chemistry

What are your plans after graduation?

After my graduation, I plan to research the effects of wildfire smoke as a lab technician at the Desert Research Institute. Next fall, I plan to apply for my Ph.D. in geochemistry.

What is the most important piece of advice you would give a new college student?

My advice to new students is to actively learn what you are passionate about. Talk to professors, apply for internships/jobs, and develop relationships with good mentors. Since we’ve been in school our whole lives, it can be hard to imagine all the possible careers related to degrees. I highly recommend talking to professors and training supervisors about their life/experience stories to find out what they have thought of doing or doing with their degrees. Internships/jobs are also great for developing a general idea of ​​what you like/dislike doing early on.

Where do you see yourself after 15 years?

In fifteen years’ time, I hope to use my knowledge of chemistry to better understand and protect the natural world. It is shocking to watch the effects of pollution and climate change unfold before me, so I would like to do my part to address the issues at hand. I hope to work with scientists, educators, science communicators, and other decision-makers to catalyze change.

Andrew Azar Department of Geography

What are your plans after graduation?

I plan to continue my education. I will be pursuing a masters degree in urban and regional planning.

What is the most important piece of advice you would give a new college student?

Get the most out of your general education courses. You may be tempted to see it as just requirements to be completed, but if you embrace it as an opportunity to fill in the gaps in your main requirements, you will differentiate yourself. Choosing a minor who completes your major can do this for you.

Where do you see yourself after 15 years?

In fifteen years, I hope to do a job in the private sector related to transportation or environmental planning. Not sure where or what the exact job is yet. This decision has yet to come.

Blake Shane, Department of Geosciences and Engineering

What are your plans after graduation?

After graduation, I plan to continue working in field operations with the Nevada Seismological Laboratory, helping maintain the Nevada seismic network and the ALERTWildfire network of cameras for several states.

What is the most important piece of advice you would give a new college student?

For new students, the best advice I can give is to find people and activities that motivate you to do better. In the stress of doing well in school, it’s easy to forget to take care of your mental health. It is very important to have people there to remind you to take some time for yourself, to have fun or to pursue hobbies. I certainly wasn’t very good at this myself, but I’ve been fortunate to have these kinds of people in my life. Either directly or indirectly, they understand why I have been able to continue to perform at a high academic level.

Where do you see yourself after 15 years?

Honestly, fifteen years is a long way down the road – and I’m just building this one as I walk all the way. Therefore, I don’t know where I will be, what I will do, or even what I want my life to look like in fifteen years. My main hope is that I will find fulfillment in my work and create more relationships with more wonderful people. The rest can fill itself as it happens!

Tanner Miller, Department of Mathematics and Statistics

What are your plans after graduation?

I plan to take one course in Mathematics at the United Nations as a non-degree student and continue working as a student in the Mathematics Center and Physics Department during the spring semester 2022. During this time, I will be applying to the UN agency for a postgraduate degree in Statistics and Data Science for the semester Fall 2022.

What is the most important piece of advice you would give a new college student?

Connect with your professors, faculty, and fellow students. Ask for help at the various resource centers if needed or just to meet other students at the UN. There is an extensive support system within the university that very few students know and use. The math center, writing and speaking center, teaching center, and many other places all have a common goal of student success.

Where do you see yourself after 15 years?

It’s hard to say where I am in fifteen years, especially since so many things can change in such a short time. However, I know that in fifteen years I will continue my education in some form, either by private study or with fellow academics and industry. In addition, I plan to continue working on my hobbies to ensure that I enjoy my time well.

Madeleine Norberg, Microbiology and Immunology

What are your plans after graduation?

After graduation, I plan to obtain a degree in phlebotomy and start applying to medical school.

What is the most important piece of advice you would give a new college student?

For any new college student, make sure you take the right classes and don’t pay for double requirements as no one else will be looking for you.

Where do you see yourself after 15 years?

In 15 years I would like to have my own clinic with a free connected gym for patients.

Casey Crawford, Neuroscience

What are your plans after graduation?

After graduation, I plan to study for the MCAT and eventually attend medical school.

What is the most important piece of advice you would give a new college student?

The advice I would give the next student would be to participate in a sports club or team to find like-minded friends. I’ve found that the people you surround yourself with make a huge difference to your college experience.

Where do you see yourself after 15 years?

In 15 years, I see myself as a surgeon and do research that will advance the medical field. I hope to discover or develop a technology that will save lives.

Daniel Tucker, Department of Physics

Daniel is applying to graduate school and is likely to pursue an advanced degree in mathematics or physics.

Megan Lovell, Department of Psychology

What are your plans after graduation?

I intend to continue my studies. I’ve learned that my strength lies in writing, and the best way to make a difference is through that medium. I’ve long learned that mental health is essential to success, but many of us struggle with it on a daily basis. Therefore, I plan to attend the MFA program to continue mastering my writing skills so that I can incorporate psychological themes into my stories.

What is the most important piece of advice you would give a new college student?

Get to know your teachers. They want to see you succeed. They understand the struggle of college more than anyone else. And most of the time, they are willing to meet you wherever you are.

Where do you see yourself after 15 years?

Surrounded by friends and family. Maybe as a bestselling author, maybe as a child psychologist, maybe as a literary agent, maybe even in the medical lab. At this point, I am open to all options because life is short and plans change. Rigidity is the destruction of creativity, and my ability to be creative got me where I am now.

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